Kauai

Kauai is an island in the mid-Pacific, part of the Hawaiian archipelago. It’s nicknamed “the Garden Isle” thanks to the tropical rainforest covering much of its surface. The dramatic cliffs and pinnacles of its Na Pali Coast have served as backdrop for major Hollywood films, while 10-mile-long Waimea Canyon and the Nounou Trails traversing the Sleeping Giant ridge are hiking destinations. 

The island of Kauai may be small, but it is rich in flavor. You can find a host of eateries that fit your style, from budget-friendly cafes to high-end restaurants with ocean views for more sophisticated tastes. Markets are brimming with colorful local produce, seafood is pulled fresh from the Pacific, and the diverse cuisine is crafted with a Hawaiian touch. 

Being the oldest populated main island in Hawaii, you can be sure that Kauai has a lot of history. It has gone through a lot through the ages, from its ancient roots and first settlers, to the arrival of the Westerners, and to its current form as part of a state under the US. As such, Kauai has been at the forefront of the changes of the times, easily leaving a historic footprint on the island. Aside from the natural beauty of its vegetation and surroundings, Kawai is also ripe with all of the influence of man since his first arrival on the island’s shores.

 

Kauaʻi is geologically the oldest of the main Hawaiian Islands. With an area of 562.3 square miles (1,456.4 km2), it is the fourth largest of the main islands in the Hawaiian archipelago, and the 21st largest island in the United States.

 

airport : Lilhue airport

 

Sugar history

The next phase in the Kauai’s history is the evolution of its economy. Driven by the enterprising spirit of the Westerners, Kauai was transformed into one of the chief sugar producers during the early part of the 19th century. Kauai’s Koloa town was witness to the establishment of a historic sugar mill that lead to an economic surge. The success of this first-ever mill prompted others to join the sugar industry. This success lasted for a century, and it brought affluence to the sugar plantation owners and Hawaii itself

One of the effects of the sugar boom in Hawaii is the influx of immigrants from different nations. As the native population is not sufficient to provide the needed workforce to keep the plantations going, immigrant laborers came from different regions to meet the demand. Most of the immigrants came from Japan, China, Puerto Rico, Philippines, and Portugal. This arrival of different immigrants contributed to the multi-cultural flavor of Kauai and Hawaii as a whole.

 

Pineapple

The next economic opportunity for Kauai is the pineapple industry. The prominent company in Kauai that was involved in pineapple production was the Kauai Fruit and Land Co. which held operations in Lawa’i. The company lasted from the early 1900s to the early 1960s. Another company, Hawaiian Canneries Co. Ltd., also did not last long as it also closed in the early 1960s.

After the rise and fall of the sugar and pineapple industry in Hawaii, the next boom in Kauai economy is tourism. As the numbers of visitors grew, so did the establishment of hotels and resorts in the island. This created thousands of jobs and new opportunities for large and small businesses alike. Currently, tourism accounts for one-third of the income of Kauai. Previous sugar plantations have now been transformed to resorts and ranches. There are also plans to use sugar cane as means to produce ethanol.

 

Things to do :

Poipu Beach Park

goldbeachWailua Falls

wailua

Waimea canyon

canyon

Comments are closed.